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>.

>.

 

Making A Successful Video

   

Advert In FIVE Steps

 

>.

Step ONE: Messaging


>.

Making a film doesn’t need to be complicated. In this 5-part blog series, I’m going to break down the 5 key stages of production so when you commission your film, it’ll be a breeze. Even if you’ve never made one before, this 101 guide will make it look like you and video marketing go ‘waaaaaaaay back'.

>.

The 5 stages are:

  1. Messaging
  2. Creative Development
  3. Planning
  4. Shooting
  5. Editing

So today we’ll start with the all-important messaging. More of a marketing term than a video one, but a very vital part that mustn’t be underestimated. The success of your film, its ROI and SEO impact, will hinge on this stage. It’s the backbone of any film, because without clarity and purpose it’s a bum deal before you even start. Think of it as the filling to your sandwich, it has to be something people actually want or need to digest.

     

Within messaging we’ll be looking at:

>.

     

>.

TOPLINE PURPOSE

One of the most common mistakes that are made at this stage, is ‘overstuffing’. Trying to get everything you’ve ever wanted to say about your company or product in one film can leave your audience confused about the 'take-home'. Don’t do that, have a tight agenda. Stay relevant to what your audience came to see; their time and attention span is short. To use our sandwich metaphor, don’t put cheese, and pickles, and sardines, and peanut butter and...because it’s a real niche market that’ll swallow all of that one!

 

Another thing to consider is audience intent. Video doesn’t change the sales funnel, it’s not a shortcut. By creating films that are fit for purpose at each stage of the purchasing process, you can qualify your viewers and increase conversions.  If you just post one, big, epic movie and they bounce, you won’t know why or how to fix it.

 

So, as an example – let’s say we are making a recruitment film for a Fintech company. Our very specific purpose and desired outcome from the film is:

 

Increase Candidate Applications for IT Developers

 

This helps us focus on the areas that are important for the targeted demographic, rather than our own opinions when producing the key messages. Back to the sandwich analogy, if we’re making sandwiches for veggies, we won’t mention our ‘Pastrami Special’ as it’s not relevant.

 

>.

KEY MESSAGES

Pull out 3 – 5 USP’s that state your case. You don’t need to list everything, the likelihood is, you have a website that contains all additional information. So, your messages might be along the lines of:

 

>.

>.

 

THE SCRIPT

Even if you’re planning to use talking heads/interviews, a script is important because it controls the arc of the narrative and guarantees your topline purpose is achieved.  At this stage, you can either have a crack at the first draft or hand it straight to your production company to write. It’s normal for a script to have several drafts – this is the first ‘meeting of the minds’ and revisions are an important part of the process; it helps everybody sit on the same page. Both parties have something to contribute and should not be ignored.  Whether it’s two or twenty drafts – GET THIS BIT RIGHT!

>.

If you’re producing a voice-over script, this is where the running time is initially decided. To give you an idea of how long your script should be, I’ve provided a few word-count-to-running-time guidelines below.

 

Video Running Time                      Word Count

30 Seconds                         :            60 words

60 Seconds                         :            135 words

90 Seconds                         :            210 words

120 Seconds                       :            285 words

180 Seconds                       :            430 words

 

>.

>.

TONE OF VOICE

And lastly for this section on messaging, it’s the tone of voice. A vital part of brand, company culture and audience appeal, it’s important to remember that words spoken aloud have a much more informal format. This doesn’t mean you’re slinging colloquialisms around left, right and centre, calling people ‘fam’ and saying your product is ‘sick’, but it means it’ll sound more natural to say ‘We’re’ instead of ‘We are’.

>.

Less is more when it comes to a script, so tone down the jargon and don’t over-explain stuff. Your voice-over artist will also give words power, warmth, authority and so on, so make sure you cast well (ie: let a professional do it, not your colleague, even if they are your boss). Let some of the other elements of your film take the strain, you don’t have to say everything out loud. The voice-over should structure the narrative but the more sensory aspects such as music, sound effects and visuals may be able to express something quicker than words can.

>.

For example; one of your USP’s might be ‘a happy office environment’. Saying this in a script can sound contrived and unconvincing but showing this visually or hearing colleagues’ laughter and enthusiasm will definitely communicate that message. Contrastingly, competitive salaries will be best mentioned as a quick aside in the script because showing a staff member counting their money like Scrooge McDuck could seem crass. The point is, think of your film in 3D format not just what’s written on the page.

>.

 

So, that’s the short and tall. Messaging is the cornerstone and really all you need to get started is…

>.

…..your video agency should be able to do the rest easily. Check back in to read about The Next Step – ‘Creative Development’ or click HERE if you can wait!!

>.

 

If you’re ready to get started, then get in touch! Call us on 01604 422911 or email production@gnufilms.co.uk . We’re a full-service video and animation company serving the whole of the UK and more!

>.

    Eve Myhill Byline Gnu Films [post_title] => How To Make A Great Corporate Video – Step ONE: Messaging [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-make-a-great-corporate-video-a-beginners-guide [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-11-01 11:46:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-01 11:46:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://gnufilms.co.uk/?p=766 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 855 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2019-10-25 14:58:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-10-25 14:58:38 [post_content] =>

>.

>.

 

Making A Successful Video

   

Advert In FIVE Steps

 

>.

Step TWO: Creative


>.

Making a film doesn’t need to be complicated. In this 5-part blog series, I’m going to break down the 5 key stages of production so when you commission your film, it’ll be a breeze. Even if you’ve never made one before, this 101 guide will make it look like you and video marketing go ‘waaaaaaaay back'.

>.

The 5 stages are:

>.

  1. Messaging
  2. Creative Development
  3. Planning
  4. Shooting
  5. Editing

So today we’ll move onto Creative Development.


This is how your story will be told visually, it refers to not only the colours, but the style of images; how they're textured, tinted and shaped. It also covers the pace, the energy and the tone of the piece.


Within creative development we’ll be looking at:

>.

 

CONCEPT

There are many nuances, as well as more obvious differences, that can make a marked difference to how your message is received. The key is ultimately to make sure your footage or animation style is fit for purpose and fit for your audience. To get the ball rolling, below are some links to show how different the same film can look with a different creative treatment. These are company films with talking heads all produced by our good-selves here at Gnu Films.


William Grant Talking Heads Video

Avara Talking Heads Video

Keyline Talking Heads video


A great springboard to get the creative ball rolling is using existing examples as references. The trick is including ones you don’t like, as well as ones that you do. To really make the most of it, you need to qualify your examples. The ‘Why’ is a massive time-saver, but you need to be prescriptive. Saying ‘I don’t like the ‘graphics’ is not enough detail. Here’s an example of great feedback.




EXISTING ASSETS

Come on, hand it over. Now. Stop hoarding it. Whether it’s a 236-page brand book (we’ve actually had one of those it was epic - but useful) or just a logo because that’s all you’ve got, send it immediately. Below I’ve compiled a list of things that are generally useful for both concept development and production further down the line:



STYLEBOARDS VS STORYBOARDS

“What’s the difference?!” I hear you cry. Essentially a style-board is like a Pinterest mood-board. It will have a combination of existing assets, descriptions and original visuals collaged together to give you a feel rather than a definitive look. It can actually lead to some much more creative films as it opens up the possibilities for organic development along the production process while ensuring you stay on brand.


A storyboard is far more prescriptive. If it’s for a film, then it may be hand-drawn or even use photos to emulate the shots that will be aimed for. If its animation it'll be pretty much bang on exactly what you’re going to get.


If you are concerned about the movement, my advice is to first make sure you’ve read the description below the picture thoroughly. If you’re still not sure, ask for clarification on the movement description. Then feedback with amends if you still think it’s too static.



BE BRAVE

Creatively, as long as your video production company is fairly experienced, the world is your oyster. So, think broadly and don’t sit safely making the same thing you or your competitor has made before. More than 500 million hours of videos are watched on YouTube each day, this is the haystack in which your needle must be found, liked and shared; make sure you stand out!


So, that’s the skinny on creative development. This part is pretty straight forward and should be quite an exciting stage as you watch things take shape Esentially, it’s the video production company or animation studio that should do the heavy lifting, all you really need to do is:



….your video agency will be able to do the rest easily. Check back in tomorrow to read about The Next Step – ‘Planning’ or click here if you can’t wait : )

If you missed out on part 1 - click here to find out about MESSAGING


If you’re ready to get started, then get in touch! Call us on 01604 422911 or email production@gnufilms.co.uk

We’re a full-service video and animation company serving the whole of the UK and more!


Eve Myhill Byline Gnu Films Director [post_title] => How to Make a Great Corporate Video-Step TWO: Creative [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-make-a-great-corporate-video-step-two [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://vimeo.com/203269673 https://vimeo.com/288043375/ea3e759ee7 https://vimeo.com/271356878/8be368763e [post_modified] => 2019-11-01 12:55:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-01 12:55:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://gnufilms.co.uk/?p=855 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 954 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2019-11-01 14:13:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-01 14:13:00 [post_content] =>

>.

>.

 

Making A Successful Video

   

Advert In FIVE Steps

 

>.

Step THREE: Planning


>.

Making a film doesn’t need to be complicated. In this 5-part blog series, I’m going to break down the 5 key stages of production so when you commission your film, it’ll be a breeze. Even if you’ve never made one before, this 101 guide will make it look like you and video marketing go ‘waaaaaaaay back'.

>.

The 5 stages are:

>.

  1. Messaging
  2. Creative Development
  3. Planning
  4. Shooting
  5. Editing

So today we’ll move onto Planning.


How this is structured will largely depend on whether you'll be making a corporate video or an animation. The process is broadly the same, but filming may require a little more involvement on your part. Essentially, this is the coordination of your project and the elements required to make it. It may also be called project coordination, production management, pre-production or something similar.


Within planning we’ll be looking at:




PRODUCTION SCHEDULE

Your video agency should produce this as soon as the project is commissioned, so technically it goes before scripting even begins. A detailed production schedule is vital to the success of your project. It lays out the details of the process as well as the dates so you know when you can expect to see something but also why that date has been chosen. It should also include reasonable client review periods including deadlines for feedback so everything stays on schedule. This schedule essentially creates the roadmap to stay on time and budget.


LOCATION SCOUTING

This may also be called a 'Location Recce’. Essentially, it’s deciding where you are going to film. There are many options and although most clients often like to film ‘on-location’ at their site, whether this is an office, a factory, a shop etc., sometimes more creative or managed environments are required. If this is the case then you or the video company will source a specific location, like a house, a coffee shop, a studio or perhaps even a park. Time should be allowed for this as finding the right place is important, it’s not just the look of the thing to be considered but also access, costs, restrictions, power supply, facilities, natural light and noise pollution if you’re recording sound.


If, however, you’re shooting at your own location, it can be helpful to provide photos of the environment, so the crew have an idea of space and lighting and potential audio issues. A physical recce can also be arranged if there are many options or potentially complicated processes that need to be rehearsed.



PERMISSIONS

This covers a range of things, but essentially some filming requires permission first. It could be filming a plant that will need to be shut down for health and safety reasons during filming or it could be getting the Council’s permission for filming at a public park on the street. It’s a necessary step to ensure smooth filming, but your production company should handle this. Do bear in mind some locations charge though, for example, National Rail can cost thousands just a for a few hours.


Consider how easy access will be. It’s likely your film crew will have lots of heavy equipment and multiple cars to park. Do you need to fill out a Risk Assessment beforehand for insurance? Get these bits ticked off asap so you don’t need to worry about that stuff. It’s less stressful when you’re not ‘on-site’ trying to sort it as this can waste valuable shoot time.



CASTING

This is the sourcing of your talent, and it’s not just limited to models and actors. Sometimes a specialist skill may be required, like a Parkour specialist, a yodeler or horse rider and so on. This can be done with an open casting, meaning you can put out a casting online, but it doesn’t always guarantee the calibre of the applicant. Alternatively, your production company can use a casting agency, which is preferable in terms of time and candidate quality but is much more expensive. Like, 50 – 70% more expensive. You know the old adage – you get what you pay for.



CONTRIBUTORS

You may be looking to do some interviews with staff or customers. These ‘contributors’ will have a massive influence on the film so they must be selected and vetted carefully. Someone that seems quite enthusiastic in the office might ‘shrink like a Primark jumper on a hot-wash’ in front of the camera. Pick a variety of contributors that you feel represent your product or company as they will now be your brand ambassadors. The world is a shallow place with a short attention span; you need to consider their visual impact and whether it aligns with your demographics, how they sound, do they speak confidently and clearly? Contributor casting should be given the same consideration as talent casting.


One of the tricky bits for interviews is scheduling. To reduce costs, you want to get your filming all done within as few days as possible. So, things to consider:



Also, I shouldn’t have to say this, but sometimes it still needs to be addressed – equality. This is very important, don’t just get 5 middle class, middle-aged, Caucasian men in….. because that is a very specific market you’re targeting.


One final note – always have a backup or two in your pocket. People flake, a lot, like…loads. A no-show is not a surprise, it’s an expectation. Without a backup, it could be you in ‘the hot seat’



SHOOT SCHEDULES / CALL SHEETS

These are usually some of the last bits to come together because all of the afore-mentioned bits need sorting first. The shoot schedule should lay-out, in detail, where everyone should be, when and what they should be doing. This includes arrival times, rigging the kit, hair & make-up, filming and breaking down again. It’s actually pretty common for it to flex a little during the day but, ultimately, it will ensure all the shots are collected and that any access issues or contributor availability issues can be avoided.
You should also receive a call-sheet. This is like a cheat sheet for filming. It has everyone’s name and contact details on from crew, to clients to contributors: it has all the location addresses on, any access codes or location contacts and an abridged itinerary of the running order of the day. Why’s it called a call sheet? Because it also has the time that everyone is needed to be ‘called to set’.

So, that’s the 411 on Planning. It should be pretty straight-forward as it’s the video production company or animation studio that should manage most of it. Really all you need to do is supply:



Your video agency should be able to do the rest easily. Check back in tomorrow to read about the next step – ‘Shooting’ or if you missed the previous blogs, see our handly links below


Step 1: Messaging Step 2: Creative Development


If you’re ready to get started, then get in touch! Call us on 01604 422911 or email production@gnufilms.co.uk. We’re a full-service video and animation company serving the whole of the UK and more!



Eve Myhill Byline Gnu Films Director [post_title] => How to Make a Great Corporate Video-Step THREE: Planning [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-make-a-great-corporate-video-step-three-planning [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-11-07 10:58:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-07 10:58:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://gnufilms.co.uk/?p=954 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1039 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2019-11-05 16:51:05 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-05 16:51:05 [post_content] =>

>.

>.

 

Making A Successful Video

   

Advert In FIVE Steps

 

>.

Step FOUR: Shooting


>.

Making a film doesn’t need to be complicated. In this 5-part blog series, I’m going to break down the 5 key stages of production so when you commission your film, it’ll be a breeze. Even if you’ve never made one before, this 101 guide will make it look like you and video marketing go ‘waaaaaaaay back'.

>.

The 5 stages are:

>.

  1. Messaging
  2. Creative Development
  3. Planning
  4. Shooting
  5. Editing

So today we’ll move onto Shooting.


Let’s be honest, this is the cool bit, right? It’s also the quickest bit. You’ll start your day shocked at just how much equipment we brought with us, but before you know it, the day’s over, you’re knackered and you’ve no biscuits left. Film crew are very much like a whirlwind. By the time shoot day arrived, if the planning has been done right, its ‘easy, breezy, cover girl’.


So, today's blog is going to focus more on handy tips for greasing the wheels of a shoot day rather than any technical info. We’ll write another blog with a bit more focus on the kit and crew and what it all does later, but for now – here’s to simplicity…


GREENROOM

If you have actors, make sure there is somewhere for them to get changed and tidy their hair, but also to keep them in ‘storage’ when not needed on set. Ideally not too far from a bathroom ; )


STORAGE

We bring an absurd amount of equipment packed into some rather bulky cases – best to have a safe room to keep them in so we’re not dragging everything around all day, a lockable room like a spare office is ideal. It also gives the crew somewhere to reconvene, break for lunch, charge batteries and so on.


ACCESS

Make sure the key crew members like the Director or Production Manager have a key fob or pass to easily get in and out of the building. There’s nothing worse than waiting for a crew member that can’t get in!


PROTOCOL

If there’s a long Health and Safety process upon arrival, or any other type of protocol that needs to be completed, tell your agency way before they produce the shoot schedule. It’s surprising how long it can take a crew of 5 people to go through this. Before you know it, you’ve lost an hour and a half of the day and with it, valuable shooting time.


NOTIFICATION

I've lost count of the number of times that I've been told we were ‘unexpected’. Whizz a quick email around the building and just let everyone know we’re coming : )


PARKING

Lots of parking as close to the entrance point as possible, please. If you don’t have parking, then Parkopedia is a great site to find somewhere nearby. If stairs are to be climbed and there's no lift, make people aware before-hand, so kit can be packed accordingly. If there is a lift and you have trolleys, then please see if one can earmarked for the day.


LUNCH

Please remember that crew are people too : ) A simple thing, that can make all the difference if forgotten about. Ideally, make sure food is readily available about 20 minutes before the break is due so we can stay on schedule. This helps to counter canteens that are only open within certain time periods and so on.


AIRCON

If sound is being recorded, it’s not ideal to have aircon / heating fans blasting out. It may seem quite quiet to you, but if we're cutting between interviewees in the film and one room has a buzzing noise and one doesn’t, you'll really notice it in the edit.


PHONES

If we're taking sound, then phones should be turned off, not just silenced.


SIGNS

Make sure there are plenty of filming signs up and around the place. Their purpose is two-fold:


  1. It serves as a general release form for any incidental appearances on camera
  2. ‘Shhh Filming’ can really reduce the noise. You’ll be surprised at how much banging, shouting and beeping goes on normally

RELEASE FORMS

These are very important, especially with the whole GDPR thing. Everyone who features on-camera should sign a release form, it will give permission in perpetuity for you to use their image and voice. If they leave the company and haven’t signed one of these, you’ll need to get a re-edit, which will cost money. Ask your production company if you don’t have one already and they will be able to provide it. Or, because we’re nice, you can use ours – see attached. Some people like these to be signed ahead of time and some do it on the day.


You have an experienced film crew with you who know what they’re doing, the above can help ensure we stick to schedule and get all the shots we came for and then maybe a few extras. Picture yourself as the sweeper in a curling match, helping keep everything moving in the right direction (yes that’s what the broom does, I googled it).


And… that’s a WRAP – which incidentally stands for Wind, Reel and Print, so bring on the wrap party!! Filming is actually pretty straight forwards as long as you have a good production team and film crew. All you really need for the day is…



Your video agency should be able to do the rest easily. Check back in tomorrow to read about the next step – ‘Shooting’ or if you missed the previous blogs, see our handly links below


Step 1: Messaging Step 2: Creative Development Step 3: Planning


If you’re ready to get started, then get in touch! Call us on 01604 422911 or email production@gnufilms.co.uk. We’re a full-service video and animation company serving the whole of the UK and more!



Eve Myhill Byline Gnu Films [post_title] => How to Make a Great Corporate Video-Step FOUR: Shooting [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-make-a-great-corporate-video-step-four-shooting [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-11-19 10:15:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-19 10:15:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://gnufilms.co.uk/?p=1039 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1072 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2019-11-19 10:15:32 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-19 10:15:32 [post_content] =>

>.

>.

 

Making A Successful Video

   

Advert In FIVE Steps

 

>.

Step FIVE: Editing


>.

Making a film doesn’t need to be complicated. In this 5-part blog series, I’m going to break down the 5 key stages of production so when you commission your film, it’ll be a breeze. Even if you’ve never made one before, this 101 guide will make it look like you and video marketing go ‘waaaaaaaay back'.

>.

The 5 stages are:

>.

  1. Messaging
  2. Creative Development
  3. Planning
  4. Shooting
  5. Editing

So today we’ll move onto Editing, this is genuinely ‘where the magic happens’. Welcome, to the finish line.


We’ll actually be producing a more detailed article about editing later on in the year authored by our very own Jack James, Editor and Creative Director extraordinaire. In this he’ll go through a variety of techniques and approaches to get your creative juices flowing but for now, we’re going to look at the nuts and bolts of the process, so you know what to expect.


The Edit is broken down into 4 Stages:



DIGITIZATION

This is actually an old term from back when tape had to be transferred into a digital format for linear editing. Nowadays we work exclusively with digital formats in non-linear editing software and so this process can also be called D.I.T (Digital Ingestion Transfer). The raw footage of the shoot, or ‘Rushes’, are transferred to a hard drive, checked for quality, reviewed, filed and then backed up. Depending on how much you filmed, this can take up to a day or two.


You can request a timecoded copy of the rushes to see what has been captured, but be aware this does come with a cost as it takes time to assemble, preview, export and test. There’ll most likely be a hard-drive cost too.


1ST DRAFT

AKA: ‘The Offline edit, Rough-cut or Assembly cut’. The purpose of this edit is to confirm the content and it's where a majority of the footage hits the cutting room floor. The subsequent tweaking, grading, timings and graphics would be wasted time if done at this early stage, because sometimes entire scenes/sequences are removed. What we need to work out is whether the core information and story is there.


If you have a voice-over led film, it may be based on a guide voiceover recorded in-house by a member of the team. This will sound a little crappy but ultimately saves you having to pay for a re-record if the script needs any final tweaks now that you’ve experienced it together with the visuals.


If it’s interview led, then it'll be cut much longer than it needs to be, so the running time will be way over. This is because the editor will cut it down as much as possible without diluting the messaging, leaving a few ‘options’ in there, and then discuss with you which bits can be trimmed down further. Most interviews are shot with two cameras, but often only one angle will be used in the rough-cut, meaning there may be some odd-looking ‘jump’ cuts.


There most likely won’t be any graphics or animations (if this is relevant) at this stage. The audio levels will be a little uneven and the editing itself will be a little ‘loose’ meaning all the slick whizzy cuts haven’t been timed out properly yet.


The most important thing for this stage is to make sure you take adequate time to review the edit, ask questions and then feedback ALL collated footage. There’s nothing more confusing than information from different people arriving in dribs and drabs, contradicting each other and often causing superfluous costs for additional, and often unnecessary edits. Make sure you and your team are all on the same page, feedback-wise. To make things a little easier, we’ve attached our feedback form template at the bottom of this article, to help to streamline the process.


2ND DRAFT

AKA: the ‘Online Edit’. This will incorporate your amends so you can see how your changes have affected the overall structure. The visuals/cutaways will also be tightened, the audio is given a more thorough mix and any animation or graphics included. It will be a much neater version and should be considered the penultimate delivery. So, any feedback after this version is delivered, is expected to be minimal; removing the odd comment, tweaking a clip, blurring out something in the background and so on. At this stage, you will need to sign off the whole film (bearing in mind any subsequent amends could be chargeable), then the final touches are made and music and any other purchased assets will be licensed and finalized.


FINAL DRAFT

This is it! The culmination of this team effort. The edit is considered complete, the colour has been graded, the audio given it’s final mix and the version you now have in your hot little hands is the final version. Usually, it’s delivered as an MP4, but it can be pretty much any format you need – just mention specifics BEFORE the project starts.


So, that’s it - Bada Bing Bada Boom!


The most important thing to remember through the edit process is…

  • Consolidate your feedback.

  • Your video agency should be able to do the rest easily. And that's it! Your film can be signed, sealed and delivered. Hopefully, this guide wasn't too long and arduous to read. Essentially it should save you going into video production half-cocked, with realistic expectations and a good idea of where your money goes. It should also help you to decide which video production company or animation studio to trust by knowing what to ask. If you have any further question or queries, please don't hesitate to get in touch as we love chatting about what we do.


    Lastly, we are going to produce a few helpful blogs in the new year about this, but you need to think carefully about what do with your completed film. Do NOT hide your new light under a bushel / ring binder / list of other stuff to do. Depending on it's purpose, there are obviously private and public channels on Youtube and Vimeo. You can also use BrightCove, internal screens, host it on your site and of course, social media pages. If you are considering it for Social then you might want to have 'cutdowns' or teasers' produced, which will have a more practical running time for viewer engagement and consider using a paid 'push' campaign, which works like a PPC (Pay Per Click). These shorter films can then include links to the full film, allowing you to track engagement and click-throughs.


    If you missed the previous blogs, which cover the first 4 stages then check out our handy links below



    If you’re ready to get started, then get in touch! Call us on 01604 422911 or email production@gnufilms.co.uk. We’re a full-service video and animation company serving the whole of the UK and more!


    Click Here for our free Feedback Form Template!



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